Final Exam – Summer 2012 (HIS 10)

HIS 10 – Modern World History

College Now

Summer  2012

Professor Rogers

Final Examination Study Guide

This study guide should provide you with all of the necessary information to study and do well on the mid-term examination. Students are to write their answers on the test sheet and any paper provided by the instructor.

The midterm will be held on Thursday, August 2, 2012.

Structure

The exam will be broken into two parts: term identification and a short answer question.

Part One – Term Identification (15 points)

Students will be given the definitions of fifteen terms drawn from the lectures and readings and they are expected to match each definition with the correct term – provided from a list on the test sheet. Each term is worth one point, for a total of fifteen points on this portion of the exam.

A list of possible terms on the test is provided below

Part Two – Short Answer (10 points)

Students will be given between five and seven short answer questions, of which they will be asked to answer TWO. Again, students are only to answer TWO questionS. Any questions answered beyond that will be ignored. The short answer question answered will be worth up to five points.

Answers are expected to be between three to four paragraphs and answer all aspects of the question. Any answer that is either too short or fails to cover every aspect of the question will lose points.

Terms

imperialism

Settler colonialism

“new” imperialism

“The Great Game”

“Plunder” Economies

Imperialism in China

The Opium War (1839-1842)

“Taiping” Rebellion

Sino-Japanese War (1894-1895)

“Open Door” Policy

Treaty ports

Boxer Rebellion (1900)

Meiji Restoration (1867-1868)

Japanese Imperialism

Second Industrial Revolution

Steel

Electricity

Automobile

Telephone

Mass Culture

Taylorism

Leisure Time

“the New Woman”

The Sexuality Question

Professionalization of Knowledge

The new sciences

Positivism

Charles Darwin (1809-1882)

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)

Albert Einstein (1879-1955)

Feminism

Liberal feminism

Maternal/domestic feminism

Suffrage movement

Entente Cordiale

Triple Alliance

Arms race

June 28, 1914

July 31, 1914

August 1, 1914

“The Great War” – World War I

Central Powers

Allied Powers

“the cult of the offensive”

Battle of the Somme

Wilson’s Fourteen Points

The Peace of Paris (1919-1920)

Treaty of Versailles

The war guilt clause

League of Nations

The mandate system

The Russian Revolution

Vladimir Lenin

Russian Civil War

“war communism”

The Great Depression

The New Deal (USA)

The Popular Front (France)

Fascism

Italian fascism

Benito Mussolini

The Black Shirts

Nazism (Germany)

Adolf Hitler

Joseph Stalin

Five Year Plans

Origins of World War 2

Blitzkrieg

Pearl Harbor

Civilian resistance

Civilian collaboration

The Holocaust

The Atomic Bomb

Total War

Battle of Britain

Firebombing of Tokyo & Dresden

Atlantic Charter (1941)

Yalta & Potsdam Conferences

The United Nations

Universal Declaration of Human Rights

Nuremberg Trials (1945)

The Cold War

Truman Doctrine

Marshall Plan (1947)

NATO

Warsaw Pact

Decolonization

Decolonization in India

Decolonization in Kenya

Land Freedom Army

Israel & Jordan

Colonel Gamal Abdel Nasser

Chinese Revolution

Cuban Missile Crisis (1962)

Détente

The Human Rights Revolution

Amnesty International

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Author: Roy Rogers

I am currently a PhD candidate in American History at the Graduate Center at the City University of New York (CUNY). My undergraduate education was at Shepherd University (Political Science & History) and I received an MA in History from George Mason University. As a historian, my research interests include early American history, the early American republic (1780 to 1830), political history, religious history, and gender history. I live in Brooklyn with my girlfriend and our cat.

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